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For those of you who haven’t read my About page, I’ve spent the last 4 years slowly completing a Masters degree, 1 class at a time. Well, I’m happy to report that the 14 hour days of this past semester are behind me (7:10-9:40PM classes should really not be a thing), and more importantly, so is my degree.

Ironically, the defining moment of finishing my degree wasn’t walking out of my final class or applying for graduation. For me, the strangest milestone was checking off my final task in Things and removing my School area, which marks the first time I’ve not had a School area in any task manager.

Now that I’m done my degree, the logical question is “What could I possibly do with all my free time?”

Of course, this question couldn’t come at a better time since I like to spend December reflecting on the past year and planning for the next. Thankfully planning comes after reflection because if anything’s clear, I did not slow down as I had intended. If anything I did the opposite, and I’m feeling it as we wrap up the year.

So for 2019, I’m going the opposite direction. I’m purposely keeping things simple.

My focus is on intentionality.

Instead of committing to new things, my intention is to focus on things I’ve already committed to – like all those house projects that have been on my to-do list since I moved in. (Hello, kitchen cabinet doors that are still sitting in the corner waiting to be painted.)

With that in mind, I will be taking a few weeks off, so this will be my last post of 2018.

Before I leave though, I want to say thank you to everyone who’s read this blog over the past year. A year ago, this blog was just another thing to check off on my path to maybe becoming some sort of writer in the distant future. Thanks to some major encouragement from my boyfriend and all of your amazing feedback, I couldn’t even begin to imagine this blog would be where it is today.

Thank you again, and warm wishes for the holidays.

Photo by MD Duran on Unsplash

My Grad School Notetaking Workflow

Now that I’ve had my iPad Pro for a while, I’ve finally settled into a routine for managing my course notes. I rely on two main apps (Goodnotes and Evernote) and both my Macbook Pro and iPad Pro.

Setting Up for the Week

Each week before class, I duplicate an existing copy of my weekly course notes to save time typing out my preferred format. It’s broken down into Administrative (typically action items or important information about the course), a list of assigned readings, an area for taking notes during that week’s lecture, and a place for the lecture slides.

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(Note in the screenshot above I have two reminders listed in the sidebar. They serve as a workaround to pin notes to the top like Apple Notes. Until Evernote decides to add the feature, this is the next best thing. I just turn off notifications so I’m not pestered by dates.)

Next, I download the assigned readings for the next week as well as the lecture slides from the previous class from the course site on Blackboard. Newly assigned readings get put into Goodnotes on the Mac. While I’m in Goodnotes, I also export any readings from the previous week to PDF and delete the previous week’s category.

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Back in Evernote, I create notes for each of the new readings and link to them in the weekly note using the Copy Note Link feature. I used to include my reading notes directly in the Weekly notes, but after noticing a few of the assigned readings were papers I’d already read for another class, I switched to keeping my notes directly with the papers themselves, linking each class to the single note for the paper. It makes noticing connections a lot easier.

The last step in preparing for the week is to create tasks in Omnifocus. I typically prefer to have all the assignments plugged in at the start of the semester, but for this class, it’s easier to enter them on a weekly basis.

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Reading

With set up done, I switch to my iPad Pro for reading and annotation within Goodnotes. If something seems particularly noteworthy I make note of that in the stub note in Evernote, but for the most part, the annotation is sufficient.

In Class

During class, I use my iPad Pro to switch between typing notes into Evernote and making additional annotations in Goodnotes.

Tidying Up

The day after class, I make sure my weekly note for the previous class is complete by adding the final annotated copy of the readings into the stub notes I created for them (they’re already linked to the main weekly note), adding the lecture slides. I end up with something that looks a bit like this.

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And then it’s time to start this whole process over for the next week!

 

Grad School Distillation with OmniOutliner Essentials

I’ve struggled with procrastination for as long as I can remember. I was always that student writing the paper hours before it was due. Exams? You could forget about studying for them. I’d put off studying for so long that I’d convince myself cramming was a lost cause. Despite my disdain for school work, I’ve managed to make it all the way to graduate school (for a second time).

But… it wasn’t until a few weeks ago that I found a process that has me completing my assignment on time if not early. (Plus it’s entirely paperless.)

Each week, my graduate coursework consists of reading 3-4 research papers and summarizing them each in a short 3-5 paragraph essay. During class, we discuss the papers as small groups before rejoining for a discussion as a class.

I read each paper in Preview, highlighting important passages as I go in yellow. I also copy these highlights into an outline in OmniOutliner Essentials. OmniOutliner Essentials is the perfect, distraction-free outlining app. I wait a day before reviewing my outline, as I feel the concepts sink in better.

While reviewing, I bold any keywords or quotes I find important. Using those boldened keywords and quotes as a sort of “skimmed down” outline, I am able to write the 3-5 paragraph summary in Byword (my favorite writing app) knowing I’ve captured all the points I wanted to include.

Once in class, these keywords and quotes also serve as the basis for talking points in discussion rather than fumbling around through a 20-30 page PDF. If a quote within the paper is mentioned during class, I highlight that in blue using Preview.

At the end of it all, I have a highlighted PDF that distinguishes between my own highlights and those mentioned in class, an outline with emphasized keywords, and a 3-5 paragraph summary, giving me a number of options to go back and review what I’ve learned.

For this whole process, I like to snap them the apps to half the screen using Moom and make sure to turn on Do Not Disturb for the ultimate, distraction-free environment. If I’m feeling particularly distracted, I’ll also turn on my Focus playlist on Spotify.